New Childhood Disorders: DMDD, IGD, BED, and SLD

New childhood disorders may increase risk of other mental health issues, such as anxiety, depression or substance abuse in children.
New Childhood Disorders: DMDD, IGD, BED, and SLD

As the world continues to progress, new challenges arise, and we must adapt to them. One such challenge is the emergence of new childhood disorders. These disorders have gained attention in recent years, and it is essential to understand them to provide the best possible care for children who may be affected.

What are the New Childhood Disorders?

New childhood disorders are conditions that affect how children behave, communicate, and interact with others. These disorders can have a big impact on how kids grow up and might need special care.

One disorder is called "Internet Gaming Disorder" (IGD). It means playing video games too much, to the point where it affects daily life. About 1-10% of gamers might have this disorder.

Another new disorder is called "Disruptive Mood Dysregulation Disorder" (DMDD). It means getting angry or upset a lot, even when it's not necessary. DMDD can be confused with bipolar disorder, but it's different.

It's important to know that not all new childhood disorders are officially recognized. Some conditions, like "Selective Eating Disorder," have been found by doctors but don't have official rules for how to diagnose them.

New Childhood Disorders: DMDD, IGD, BED, and SLD

Recent research has led to the discovery of new childhood disorders that were previously unknown. Some of these disorders include:

Disruptive Mood Dysregulation Disorder (DMDD)

Disruptive Mood Dysregulation Disorder (DMDD) is a relatively new diagnosis that is characterized by severe and recurrent temper tantrums in children. This condition is often challenging for parents and caregivers to manage, as the outbursts are intense and can last for hours.

Symptoms of DMDD

  • Severe, recurrent temper tantrums that are out of proportion to the situation
  • Extreme emotional dysregulation and irritability nearly every day
  • Difficulty functioning in daily life due to the severity of the emotional outbursts
  • Chronic, persistent irritable or angry mood most of the day

It is important to note that DMDD is not the same as typical childhood behavior, such as the "terrible twos." The emotional outbursts experienced by children with DMDD are much more severe and interfere with their ability to function in daily life.

Treatment for DMDD typically involves therapy and medication management. With proper diagnosis and treatment, children with DMDD can learn to manage their emotions and lead happy, healthy lives.

Internet Gaming Disorder (IGD)

Free photo two kids with laptop and tablet

Internet Gaming Disorder (IGD) is a condition that is characterized by excessive and prolonged gaming that leads to significant impairment in social, academic, or occupational functioning. Children with IGD may spend an excessive amount of time gaming, to the point where it interferes with their ability to participate in other activities or maintain healthy relationships.

Symptoms of Internet Gaming Disorder

  • Preoccupation with internet gaming
  • Loss of interest in other activities
  • Continuing to game despite negative consequences, such as poor grades or strained relationships
  • Difficulty controlling the amount of time spent gaming
  • Withdrawal symptoms, such as anxiety, irritability, or sadness when gaming is taken away

It is important to note that not all children who enjoy playing video games have IGD. The key difference between normal gaming behavior and IGD is the degree to which it interferes with a child's daily life.

If you suspect that your child may have IGD, it is important to seek the help of a qualified mental health professional. Treatment for IGD typically involves therapy and behavioral interventions aimed at reducing excessive gaming and improving social and emotional functioning. With proper diagnosis and treatment, children with IGD can learn to manage their gaming habits and lead healthy, balanced lives.

Binge Eating Disorder (BED)

Binge Eating Disorder (BED) is a type of eating disorder that is characterized by recurrent episodes of eating large amounts of food in a short period, accompanied by a sense of loss of control. Children with BED may feel like they can't stop eating or control how much they eat during these episodes.

Symptoms of Binge Eating Disorder

  • Recurrent episodes of binge eating
  • Eating large amounts of food when not physically hungry
  • Feeling a sense of loss of control during binge episodes
  • Eating rapidly during binge episodes
  • Eating alone or hiding food during binge episodes
  • Feeling guilty, ashamed, or distressed after binge eating

It is important to note that BED can have serious physical and emotional consequences if left untreated. Children with BED may experience depression, anxiety, and other mental health issues as a result of their condition.

Treatment for BED typically involves therapy and nutritional counseling aimed at helping children develop healthy eating habits and manage their emotions around food. With proper diagnosis and treatment, children with BED can learn to manage their symptoms and lead healthy, balanced lives.

Specific Learning Disorder (SLD)

Specific Learning Disorder (SLD) is a condition that is characterized by difficulties in learning and using academic skills. Children with SLD may struggle with reading, writing, or math despite adequate intelligence and education.

Symptoms of Specific Learning Disorder

  • Difficulty reading accurately or fluently
  • Difficulty understanding written text
  • Difficulty spelling words correctly
  • Difficulty with written expression
  • Difficulty with basic math concepts and calculations

It is important to note that SLD can impact a child's academic performance and self-esteem. Without proper support and interventions, children with SLD may fall behind their peers and struggle in school.

Treatment for SLD typically involves educational accommodations and specialized interventions aimed at improving academic skills and building self-confidence. With proper diagnosis and treatment, children with SLD can learn to manage their symptoms and succeed academically.

Related: Learning Disabilities Statistics and Prevalence

Risk Factors for Developing New Childhood Disorders

While the exact causes of new childhood disorders are not fully understood, research has identified several risk factors that may increase a child's likelihood of developing one of these conditions. Some of these risk factors include:

Genetics

Certain new childhood disorders, such as DMDD and BED, may have a genetic component. Children who have close relatives with these conditions may be more likely to develop them themselves.

Environmental factors

Exposure to certain environmental toxins or stressors during critical periods of development may increase a child's risk of developing a new childhood disorder.

Trauma

Children who experience trauma, such as abuse or neglect, may be more likely to develop emotional dysregulation disorders like DMDD.

Screen time

Excessive screen time, particularly for young children, has been linked to an increased risk of IGD.

Having one or more risk factors does not necessarily mean that a child will develop a new childhood disorder. However, being aware of these risk factors can help parents and caregivers take steps to reduce their child's risk by promoting healthy habits and seeking early intervention if necessary.

The Impacts of New Childhood Disorders on Families and Communities

Free photo portrait of sad girl holding teddy bear

The emergence of new childhood disorders can have far-reaching impacts on families and communities. Here are some of the ways in which these conditions can affect those around them:

  • Parents of children with new childhood disorders may experience stress, anxiety, and feelings of isolation as they navigate the challenges of supporting their child's unique needs.
  • Children with certain conditions, such as DMDD or IGD, may struggle to form healthy social connections or maintain positive relationships with peers and family members.
  • New childhood disorders can place a burden on schools and other community resources. For example, educators may need to provide additional support or accommodations to help children with SLD succeed academically.
  • Mental health professionals may be in high demand as more children are diagnosed with emotional dysregulation disorders like DMDD.

It is important for families and communities to work together to support children with new childhood disorders. This might include advocating for better access to mental health services, creating support groups for parents and caregivers, or simply being understanding and compassionate towards those affected by these conditions.

By taking a proactive approach to supporting children with new childhood disorders, we can ensure that they have the opportunity to thrive and reach their full potential.

How to Diagnose New Childhood Disorders in Children?

Diagnosing new childhood disorders can be challenging as many of these conditions share similar symptoms with other disorders. However, there are some key steps that healthcare providers can take to accurately diagnose and treat these disorders.

Steps to diagnose

The first step in diagnosing a new childhood disorder is to conduct a thorough evaluation of the child's medical history and current symptoms. This may include:

  • Gathering information from parents or caregivers
  • Conducting a physical exam
  • Administering various tests or assessments

Healthcare providers should also consider any risk factors that may increase a child's likelihood of developing a new childhood disorder, such as genetics or environmental factors. Additionally, it is essential to rule out other potential causes of the child's symptoms before making a diagnosis.

Treatment plan

Once a diagnosis has been made, healthcare providers can work with parents and caregivers to develop an individualized treatment plan tailored to the child's specific needs. This may involve:

  • Therapy
  • Medication management
  • Educational accommodations
  • Other interventions aimed at helping the child manage their symptoms and improve their overall quality of life.

Early Help for Kids with New Disorders

Early help is important for kids with new disorders. When we catch these problems early, we can help kids learn how to manage their symptoms and feel better. Studies show that early help is key to good outcomes for kids with new disorders. For example, kids with DMDD who get early treatment may be better at controlling their emotions. And kids with IGD who get help early may be less likely to have problems with school or friends.

Early help is also important for families. By working with doctors, teachers, and other helpers, parents can learn how to best support their child. If you think your child might have a new disorder, talk to a doctor or mental health professional. With early help and the right treatment, kids with these problems can feel better and do well.

Long-Term Effects of Untreated or Poorly Managed New Childhood Disorders

If left untreated or poorly managed, new childhood disorders can have serious long-term effects on a child's mental health and well-being. Here are some potential consequences that may persist into adulthood:

Increased Risk of Mental Health Issues

Children with new childhood disorders may be at increased risk of developing other mental health issues, such as anxiety, depression, or substance abuse. This is particularly true if the underlying condition is not properly diagnosed and treated.

Social and Emotional Impairment

New childhood disorders can interfere with a child's social and emotional development, making it difficult for them to form healthy relationships or regulate their emotions effectively. This can lead to ongoing difficulties in adulthood.

Academic Struggles

Children with certain new childhood disorders, such as SLD, may experience ongoing academic struggles if their condition is not properly diagnosed and treated. This can have significant consequences for their future educational and career opportunities.

Financial Burden

Untreated new childhood disorders can also place a significant financial burden on families over time. The cost of ongoing treatment and support services can add up quickly, particularly if the child requires specialized care.

It is essential for parents and caregivers to seek early intervention and treatment for children with new childhood disorders to minimize the potential long-term effects of these conditions. With proper support and management, children with these conditions can go on to live happy, healthy lives as adults.

Strategies for Managing Challenging Behaviors Associated with New Childhood Disorders

Caring for a child with a new childhood disorder can be challenging, particularly when it comes to managing difficult behaviors. Here are some strategies that parents and caregivers can use to help children manage their symptoms and improve their overall quality of life:

1. Establish Consistent Routines

Children with new childhood disorders often thrive on structure and routine. By establishing consistent routines for meals, bedtime, and other daily activities, parents and caregivers can help children feel more secure and in control.

2. Practice Positive Reinforcement

Positive reinforcement is a powerful tool for encouraging positive behaviors in children with new childhood disorders. This might include offering rewards or praise when a child completes a task or exhibits appropriate behavior.

3. Use Visual Aids

Visual aids, such as picture schedules or social stories, can be helpful in providing children with clear expectations and reducing anxiety. These tools can be particularly useful for children with SLD or DMDD.

4. Encourage Physical Activity

Regular physical activity has been shown to improve mood and reduce symptoms of certain childhood disorders, including IGD and DMDD. Parents and caregivers should encourage children to engage in regular exercise or outdoor play whenever possible.

5. Seek Professional Help

Finally, it is important for parents and caregivers to seek professional help if they are struggling to manage their child's symptoms on their own. Mental health professionals can provide valuable support and guidance in developing effective strategies for managing challenging behaviors associated with new childhood disorders.

By using these strategies consistently over time, parents and caregivers can help children with new childhood disorders learn how to manage their symptoms effectively and lead happy, healthy lives.

Conclusion

The emergence of new childhood disorders is a growing concern for parents, caregivers, and healthcare professionals alike. While the exact causes of these conditions are not fully understood, early intervention and treatment can make a significant difference in a child's ability to manage their symptoms and lead a healthy, balanced life.

It is important for parents and caregivers to be aware of the risk factors associated with new childhood disorders and seek help if they suspect their child may be struggling with one of these conditions. By working together with healthcare providers, educators, and other community resources, we can ensure that children with new childhood disorders receive the support they need to thrive.

Sources

More Resources

see all